FastStone Image Viewer is awesome

I’ve been doing digital photography for many years and have come across a number of applications that claim to be “photo managers” with functions for fast viewing, basic tasks like cropping and re-sizing, etc. I realize it quite often comes down to personal taste, so you are welcome to completely ignore this post 🙂

I mainly work with adjustments, cropping, and re-sizing when I work with photos. For most post-shoot processing, I use Lightroom. I was once a fond user of the ACDSee products, used as my “Swiss Army knife”. But ever since I ran into the FastStone Image Viewer, I have uninstalled most other similar utilities. Being a fan of Shareware, and similar, I have registered the product for commercial use, and it’s well worth the money!

If you’re looking for a very fast viewer, manager, and “Swiss Army knife” for your photo management, give FastStone Image Viewer a go. It’ll handle all major graphic formats including BMP, JPEG, JPEG 2000, GIF, PNG, PCX, TIFF, WMF, ICO, TGA, and camera raw files. Oh, and it’s not bloatware 🙂

Now, if I could only have the FastStone Image Viewer for Linux too ….

You’ll find FastStone Image Viewer here: faststone.org

Using Shared Resources from your Linux workstation in your RemoteDesktop (RDP) environment and Windows Server

remminaIf you, like me, are using Ubuntu – or similar – for your daily stuff and need to connect to a Windows Server by using RemoteDesktop (RDP) / TerminalServer, you may find that local (Linux) resources are not made available to you on the Windows side.

The Remmina client on at least Ubuntu 14.04.LTS is very outdated. Go grab the latest version directly from their site. Installs without issues and gives you a “somewhat” more up-to-date RemoteDesktop Client for Ubuntu Linux.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:remmina-ppa-team/remmina-next
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install libfreerdp-plugins-standard remmina remmina-plugin-rdp

#remmina #linux #rdp #remotedesktop

 

Removing stubborn account and/or account alias in Zimbra

ZimbraZimbra can sometimes be very stubborn when it comes to removing an account or an account alias either via the admin console or by using zmprov. That’s when LDAP access comes in handy. This may, or may not, help you:

# su - zimbra
$ source ~/bin/zmshutil 
$ zmsetvars
$ ldapdelete -r -x -H $ldap_master_url \
                   -D $zimbra_ldap_userdn 
                   -w $zimbra_ldap_password \
                   uid=theuid,ou=people,dc=zimbra,dc=DOMAIN,dc=com

Possible output may be:

ldap_search: No such object (32)
ldap_delete: No such object (32)
  matched DN: dc=com

You can see which matches have been made and what has been (or has not been) removed.

When will Adobe Lightroom support Sony Cybershot DSC-RX100 RAW images?

Sony DSC-RX100It’s taking Adobe a surprisingly long time to add RAW (lens correction profile) support for the excellent compact digital camera Sony DSC-RX100. I’m curious as to what the reason could possibly be? The Sony Cybershot DSC-RX100 compact camera is by far on par with Canons S90, S95, S100, etc. series compact digital cameras. What seems to be the problem?

When Gimp 2.8 gets confused about Single-Window Mode

Using Gimp 2.8 and Single-Window Mode under Ubuntu 12.04.LTS + Gnome, I ran into somewhat of a snag today. No matter what I did, I could not get the tool palette to integrate into Single-Window Mode. I toggled the Single-Window setting to no avail. Re-starting Gimp didn’t yield any improvements. There was, however, a simple solution.

Make sure Gimp is not running. From a terminal, go to your home directory and then .gimp-2.8 (~/.gimp-2.8). Remove the two files sessionrc and  toolrc. Re-start Gimp, toggle the Single-Window Mode setting, and make sure it’s ON  (it’s under the “Windows” menu). Note, this is applicable to Gimp 2.8 and above.

Locating older version of MySQL 4, MySQL 5, source code, binaries, rpm, etc.

Quite some time ago, we needed to move a customer’s MySQL 4 server from one location to another. In the process, we figured we’d update the server to use some moderately modern version like MySQL 5.0 at least. Also, if we were to have any chance of virtualizing and upgrading the actual server environment to something more modern like Ubuntu 10.04.LTS or 12.04.LTS, or Debian 6.0, we’d have to re-compile the sources regardless. Not taking other incompatibilities into account, that line of thinking ran into Chuck Norris because the Windows DLLs supplied with the application using the database were not compatible with anything but MySQL 4.

The particular version of MySQL 4 running on the customer’s server was self-compiled (by us), so I figured I’d at least locate the “most recent” version of MySQL 4. To my surprise, this turned out to be harder than I could possibly imagine. In a world where “nobody” forgets anything, I could not find a single trace of a source distribution for MySQL 4. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Apple probably know the size of shoes I wear, but they don’t know where MySQL 4 sources are located. This struck me as very odd as MySQL 4 was a) very popular, b) open source, and c) should at least reside on half a dozen servers on the Internet, or so I thought.

Like a core dump out of the blue skies, someone Skyped me a link today. The person had ran into a mirror archive and remembered that I was looking for this “eons ago”. I have now mirrored most of that archive into/onto my own cloud store. I’ll go through that in a few days and remove the things I don’t need, but this may very well turn out to he a lifesaver.

I wonder if Sun and/or Oracle decided that keeping old MySQL versions around was a bad idea …

If you, like me, need to find some odd version of MySQL, for whatever reason, here are two links that may be of good use to you:

http://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/ftp.mysql.com/Downloads/
http://mirror.provenscaling.com/mysql/

Google owns your content, so by all means, use Google Drive

Your content in our Services

“When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content. The rights you grant in this license are for the limited purpose of operating, promoting, and improving our Services, and to develop new ones. This license continues even if you stop using our Services (for example, for a business listing you have added to Google Maps).”

Google Terms of Service

It took Google five+ years to fail in cloning Dropbox, and they didn’t want people using Linux in combination with other operating systems to switch over apparently.

Other links:

www.googlemonopoly.eu/index.php/2011/03/google-owns-your-content-here-is-the-proof

How to improve Facebook-security with a few clicks

Many social platforms have been accused of a lax approach to security. They either make it very hard for their users to enable simple security measures (why?), or they simply don’t have any enhanced levels of security (why?). Facebook does have some of these features available, and they’re not that hard to enable. Go to Account settings > Security and check them out. It’ll take you three minutes, tops, to enable some basic security features.

Of course, if you leave your Mobile Phone unprotected, or are using a phone from a manufacturer that doesn’t allow application PIN-code protection, your Facebook App in your Mobile Phone will be your weakest link. If you’re using an Android device, the awesome Perfect AppLock app will let you protect your Facebook App, and anything else you want protected with a PIN-code or unlock pattern; including Gallery, Camera, Address Book, etc.