Fixing some keyboard shortcuts in XFCE (Ctrl+F5 and Ctrl+Alt+T)

Old habits die hard, or something like that 🙂 Cloning one of my Ubuntu Desktop set-ups to a VirtualBox environment, I switched to using XFCE4 for my desktop (“xubuntu”). This works very well and the transition is minor. Most of the applications I use work very well in both Gnome and XFCE, apart from two keyboard shortcuts I use very often.

Ctrl+F5

Ctrl+F5 to force a page/cache re-load in many browsers is attached to workspace switching in XFCE. I only have four workspaces (and rarely use more than two), so I don’t need this shortcut.

To make Ctrl+F5 work as expected (for me) in the browsers, simply go to the Application Menu or “Start” menu (upper left corner in XFCE by default), scroll down to Settings and choose “Settings Manager”. In there, select “Window Manager”. Move to the “Keyboard” tab and scroll the list until you find something with Ctrl+F5 in the “shortcut” column. For me, this was defined as “Woprkspace 5”. Choose to Clear the shortcut when the selection bar is in the right place. Click “Close” and voila, your Ctrl+F5 reload shortcut now works again.

Ctrl+Alt+T

I don’t know how people survive without a shortcut for opening a Terminal, but I guess they do. From Gnome, I’ve been used to being able to open up a new Terminal quickly by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T. This does not work in XFCE by default, but is easily remedied using a method similar to that of Ctrl+F5 above.

To assign Ctrl+Alt+T to open a new Terminal in XFCE, go to the Application Menu or “Start” menu (same upper left corner as before), scroll down to Settings and choose “Settings Manager”. In there, select “Keyboard”. Move to the “Application Shortcuts” tab and click the “Add” button. Now specify the application you want to open for your shortcut, in my case xfce4-terminal, and click OK. XFCE will now ask you for the desired keyboard shortcut, in my case Ctrl+Alt+T. And we’re done!

If you want to open the “preferred application” for “Terminal” in XFCE, instead of a specific terminal application, go and lookup how to use “exo-open”, which is a way to say “Please open my preferred application for …” in XFCE.

Enjoy your shortcuts!

wget segfault | wget segmentation fault

We mirror the Webmin website to bring it somewhat closer to Sweden, and recently I had to move the hosted mirror to another of our servers running Debian 8. All of a sudden, a cron job that had been working for many years went tits up with a segmentation fault.

Odd, to say the least. It became even more strange when I turned on “verbose” (-v) output and wget told me that “UTF8 cannot be converted to UTF8”. This is a truly silly error message, imho. wget apparently knows the local encoding, and it apparently knows the remote encoding, so why is it attempting a conversion when there’s non conversion needed?#stupid

Hello?

Adding –no-iri to the wget command-line solves this issue.

Using Shared Resources from your Linux workstation in your RemoteDesktop (RDP) environment and Windows Server

remminaIf you, like me, are using Ubuntu – or similar – for your daily stuff and need to connect to a Windows Server by using RemoteDesktop (RDP) / TerminalServer, you may find that local (Linux) resources are not made available to you on the Windows side.

The Remmina client on at least Ubuntu 14.04.LTS is very outdated. Go grab the latest version directly from their site. Installs without issues and gives you a “somewhat” more up-to-date RemoteDesktop Client for Ubuntu Linux.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:remmina-ppa-team/remmina-next
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install libfreerdp-plugins-standard remmina remmina-plugin-rdp

#remmina #linux #rdp #remotedesktop

 

rsyslogd eats CPU on OpenVZ

All of a sudden, rsyslogd on an Ubuntu installation running under OpenVZ is using 100% CPU. One alternative is to replace rsyslogd for syslog-ng, but if you want to “fix” rsyslogd instead, here’s how:

service rsyslog stop
sed -i -e 's/^$ModLoad imklog/#$ModLoad imklog/g' /etc/rsyslog.conf
service rsyslog start

Credits: www.ramnode.com

When Gimp 2.8 gets confused about Single-Window Mode

Using Gimp 2.8 and Single-Window Mode under Ubuntu 12.04.LTS + Gnome, I ran into somewhat of a snag today. No matter what I did, I could not get the tool palette to integrate into Single-Window Mode. I toggled the Single-Window setting to no avail. Re-starting Gimp didn’t yield any improvements. There was, however, a simple solution.

Make sure Gimp is not running. From a terminal, go to your home directory and then .gimp-2.8 (~/.gimp-2.8). Remove the two files sessionrc and  toolrc. Re-start Gimp, toggle the Single-Window Mode setting, and make sure it’s ON  (it’s under the “Windows” menu). Note, this is applicable to Gimp 2.8 and above.