Troubles doing factory reset on a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter

If you’re having problems doing a factory reset on a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter, and can’t ping the router on 192.168.1.1 or connect to the admin web interface, you may want to check that you are connecting your computer to the eth0 port on the router. It’s not immediately obvious that this is where the admin interface is residing at https://192.168.1.1. Oh, and don’t forget to hardwire your own computer to the 192.168.1.0-network. This is really a no-brainer, but still not entirely obvious.

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

The Sigma USB Dock, a good idea for self-service firmware upgrades

In my opinion, Sigma has made somewhat of a comeback in the past few years when it comes to camera lenses, in particular when it comes to image quality. I can only speak from a Canon perspective, but from friends and associates, I hear this holds true for other camera brands as well.

Something that can be rather annoying with lenses is focus micro adjustment or AF focus micro adjustment, as well as firmware updates. Manufacturers of lenses (and cameras) all seem to have different solutions, of varying degree.

Sigma has an accessory called the Sigma USB Dock, which is a rather simple device that connects to your computer via an USB cable. After installing the software, you simply connect your Sigma lens to the USB Dock and the software will query the Sigma database for firmware upgrades. It will also allow you to perform micro adjustments.

The firmware upgrade process is simple enough, but be careful when doing AF micro adjustments, it may affect your photographic results 🙂 The Sigma USB Dock does not support all Sigma lenses. You can find out more information about the Sigma USB Dock here: www.sigma-global.com/en/lenses/cas/product/accessories/usb-dock/

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

FastStone Image Viewer is awesome

I’ve been doing digital photography for many years and have come across a number of applications that claim to be “photo managers” with functions for fast viewing, basic tasks like cropping and re-sizing, etc. I realize it quite often comes down to personal taste, so you are welcome to completely ignore this post 🙂

I mainly work with adjustments, cropping, and re-sizing when I work with photos. For most post-shoot processing, I use Lightroom. I was once a fond user of the ACDSee products, used as my “Swiss Army knife”. But ever since I ran into the FastStone Image Viewer, I have uninstalled most other similar utilities. Being a fan of Shareware, and similar, I have registered the product for commercial use, and it’s well worth the money!

If you’re looking for a very fast viewer, manager, and “Swiss Army knife” for your photo management, give FastStone Image Viewer a go. It’ll handle all major graphic formats including BMP, JPEG, JPEG 2000, GIF, PNG, PCX, TIFF, WMF, ICO, TGA, and camera raw files. Oh, and it’s not bloatware 🙂

Now, if I could only have the FastStone Image Viewer for Linux too ….

You’ll find FastStone Image Viewer here: faststone.org

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

Slow SMTP sessions and SSH logins on your Zimbra server?

When upgrading a Zimbra server to a somewhat recent version (8.7.3 for example), it may attempt to install its own DNS Cache (zimbra-dnscache). It’s obvious that this may cause issues if you are running some other DNS caching service, or your own BIND, on the server. But these are rather obvious issues and not unique to Zimbra.

What is not, however, equally obvious is that you may think that zimbra-dnscache is actually running, and that it is actually doing what it is supposed to be doing.

My first hint that things weren’t as they appeared to be was extremely slow external SMTP sessions when clients like Thunderbird and other “client mailers”, as well as some web based Helpdesk applications were attempting to send e-mail via Zimbra.

The upgrade to Zimbra 8.7.3 had gone quite well, so it wasn’t an obvious place to start looking.

Until I noticed that SSH logins were also quite slow to this server. They had never been slow before. Checking the SSH configuration on the server did not reveal much other than the fact that it was indeed using reverse DNS lookups.

Checking /etc/resolv.conf made everything clear. Zimbra had, in attempt to use its own zimbra-dnscache, added “nameserver 127.0.0.1” to /etc/resolv.conf. In a perfect world, that may have been what I wanted …

After removing 127.0.0.1 from /etc/resolv.conf, inbound SMTP sessions from “client mailers” and web applications went from 7-10 seconds down to 0.5-0.1 seconds. Case closed.

I’m thinking Zimbra should add a post-installation sanity check. When all services are up and running, a DNS lookup to a known host (www.zimbra.com for example) should return within less than a second or two, anything else is an indication that the system may not function as intended.

#zimbra-dnscache

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
2

PHP is_numeric () fails WordPress version string check

This is, perhaps, obvious to most PHP developers. But it came somewhat as a surprise to me.

Using is_numeric () for validating a WordPress version string, such as ‘4.7’, does not seem to work very well when WordPress introduces minor releases such as ‘4.7.1’.

Since I cannot be bothered to figure out why it behaves in this (erratic, IMHO) way, I have since replaced the call to is_numeric () with a small function using a simple regular expression (regexp):

    function wpVersionStringCheck ($vs)                                                                                                 
    {                                                                                                                                   
        return (preg_match ('/^(\d+\.)+\d+$/', $vs));                                                                                   
    }

I’m sure there is a hole in there somewhere, but on the following strings at least, it gives me the desired result:

1.0 is valid
1.0. is invalid
1.0.1 is valid
1.banana.0 is invalid

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

ttf-mscorefonts-installer and Ubuntu 16

As has been confirmed in a number of posts on the Internet, there’s a problem with the ttf-mscorefonts-installer package on Ubuntu 16.

There are a number of solutions, and as odd as it might sound, solutions that work for some will fail for others.

I had to mix a number of suggested solutions to get it working on Ubuntu 16.04.LTS. This is what worked for me, your mileage may vary:

sudo rm -rf /var/lib/update-notifier/package-data-downloads/partial/*
sudo dpkg -P ttf-mscorefonts-installer

After which I went to this page to get an updated version of the ttf-mscorefonts-installer:

https://packages.debian.org/en/sid/all/ttf-mscorefonts-installer/download

And from the directory to where you downloaded the .deb file to:

sudo dpkg --install ttf-mscorefonts-installer_3.6_all.deb

Good luck!

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

P-Floyd, the awesome Pink Floyd tribute band

What a show, what a performance. I knew P-Floyd was good and certainly wouldn’t put Pink Floyd to shame, but I had not expected this! Wow! I had previously seen Brit Floyd, but I think P-Floyd blew them away. Of course nothing compares to Pink Floyd, but I’m so glad I got to see P-Floyd in action! @ Rival in Stockholm, Sweden on 19 November 2016.

More pictures here: flic.kr/s/aHskQ6ih1P

20161119_1000114 20161119_1000135 20161119_1000173 20161119_1000218

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

It’s not a new world today, tomorrow, nor any other day

People are outraged at the outcome of the US Presidential Election 2016, but I’m not quite sure why. Politicians are throwing themselves at the mercy of the Political Correctness lobby and looking for ways to emigrate to some other nation.

I get the fact that you may not like the outcome of a given election, but there mere fact that you are taking part of an election, in a place where one can hope the outcome isn’t rigged, means that you are part of a democracy, even if you think it’s democrazy.

I’m not for a specific candidate of the two offered, but it seems many people have voted for one candidate with the only merit in mind that they dislike the other. The two candidates played their game as best they could, and one of them won.

Trump could never win the election by playing the political game. He’s not a politician. So he shifted the focus to other issues. This is a reasonable tactic in any conflict situation. If you can’t beat your opponent at their game, change the game. Trump made the election be about something completely different than the issues Clinton wanted to raise awareness about. We have seen this in other countries and other elections, and we will continue to see this until “the politicians” get wise and figure out a strategy to highlight the issues they can actually do something about, and possibly win an election with.

Trump is also a very easy media target because of the outbursts. So media attacks him, once again shifting focus from political issues. I’m guessing you can say they took the bait, hook, line, and sinker; and I don’t understand how you on one hand can claim to be a proper journalist, and on the other hand fall for something as obvious as this. It’s called misdirection, smoke and mirrors, or just simply marketing. Cheap tactics, cheap points, and a destructive game? Absolutely. Effective? Very. Mainly thanks to media.

It’s been done before, and it’ll happen again.

Just my two cents, and I’m sure there are about a billion or more other people with different cents, and that’s OK too.

Share:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Google Buzz
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
0

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes